Breathing Meditation by Gen Tharchin

To take an effective break, you just need to let go for awhile.
Put your thoughts on hold.

Just sit back, close your eyes and let go.
Whatever you were thinking about just then will wait for 5 or 10 minutes.

Follow your breath for awhile and come back refreshed.
Let the yogi Gen Tharchin tell us how…

* • .¸ 

GenTarchin @ Tharpaland

☆ *  ‘

“Sit in a relaxed comfortable position, with your back as straight as possible without being uncomfortable or tense.

And now scan through you body, looking at all the different parts of your body, one at a time, to make sure they’re comfortable and relaxed, free from tension or strain.
If you find any areas of tension, relax them.

And now turn your attention to the subtle sensation at the tip of your nostrils, or perhaps just inside your nostrils [or even on your lips], associated with each inhalation, each exhalation of the breath.

For a few moments, notice the slightly cooler sensation associated with the inhalation; and the slightly warming sensation, or pressure, associated with the exhalation.”

In this way, just observe the subtle tactile sensation of the breath for a few minutes.

As you finish, you may want to add ‘for the highest good of all’,
then slowly and gently come back your normal state of awareness.

Taken from the first 3 minutes of a meditation given by Gen Kelsang Tharchin, fully qualified meditation master, at MKMC in 2011.

Like this ~ Breathing Meds and Present Moment, Peaceful Moment on here.
The perils of distraction to come…

¸   . •   ☽   *

  
Fantasy Forest
 ¸.•

Reminiscent of Tharpaland, Tharchin’s retreat centre in Scotland.
It used to be one of my favourite places. It felt incredibly serene and blessed.

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Breathing Meditation Soothes Stressed Nerves.

Sometimes, like now, I get totally stressed out over nothing, and can get myself into a right state which is totally unrelated to the situation in hand.

 ~ So, a reality check is needed. Stop my frenetic mind doing over-time ~

How much time can I spend worrying about inconsequetialities? And can I really expect to make any clear decisions (or find anything) in a mind all stirred up by mild panic? It’s like my mind’s a pond, and I’ve  waded in with a big stick, stirred up all the muck from the bottom, and freaked the fish out.

So, walk back onto firm ground, put the stick down and sit quietly for awhile.
Now breathe.
I like breathing.
Apart from being dead essential for life, breath is a reliable, neutral and ever-present object of meditation.
Breathing’s easy, too (even if we need an inhaler to get there, there’s not too much effort involved.)
Breathing meditation’s good for beginners to old pros.

I do Tarchin’s  breathing meditation every morning (abridged version to follow). Following our breath is a wonderfully basic and profound practice. We can start by just becoming aware of our breath. Don’t force it or think that you’re not doing it right – it’s just breathing. We’re just noticing it. And just by doing this, our breath naturally slows and becomes deeper as we relax. This is better than TV – we can’t really relax watching TV, our mind’s all over the place. Instead we simply watch our breath.  Let the other thoughts pass on by, we can return to them when we’re done. Re-focus on the breath and to this object, only pay attention.

Refs:
Luna Kadampa’s ‘short meditations‘ is a great resource too.

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