Want Spiritual Power? Rely on Je Tsongkhapa!

Because Je Tsongkhapa is the embodiment of all Buddhas’ wisdom, compassion and spiritual power at once, by relying on him we can attain these good qualities.

Je Tsongkhapa empowerment leaflet, ed.

_/\_

Blessings of Spiritual Power

Bodhisattva Vajrapani

Je Tsongkhapa is an emanation of Buddha Vajrapani, whose function is to destroy the negative minds of living beings by bestowing power on their body, speech and mind.
Liberated from the oppressive weight of negativity, we are free to power on with our lives, and reach the desired goal.

Asking for help from the holy beings is like opening the shutters on a sunny day, and letting the sun in. The sun’s always shining, all we have to do it let it in.
Buddha’s blessings are the same.
They’re always blessing the minds of living beings, it’s their job. By opening up to these blessings, we can transform our mind, and therefore our world.

Like this:
Manjushri mantras are good for dispelling mental cloudiness: Clearing the Confusion with Buddha’s Blessings
Lama Yeshe: benefits of relying on Lama Tsongkhapa

Kadampa Life: What are Blessings? As Shantideva says in the beginning of Guide to the Bodhisattva’s Way of Life, Buddha’s blessings are like lightning during a dark night, quickly illuminating the environment and so forth. Similarly, Buddha’s blessings suddenly illuminate our mind with positivity, peace, and calm. At that time we are happy.

Credits:
Je Tsongkhapa Empowerment notes from Gen Chönden’s empowerment teachings 20th April 2013, via Aileen Glen.
Ref: Heart Jewel, by Geshe Kelsang Gyatso.
Original flyer by Becky Maybury

Click on images to make biG 

Make the Perfect New Year’s Resolution Based on an Awareness of Death

…Continued from HAPPY NEW YEAR! Buddhist Meditation on Death

Excerpt from Amitabha Centre publicity:

Death Med GKG text

As the New Year Begins ~
Make the Perfect Resolution 

Gen Chönden’s advice to “Follow the path of peaceful, positive minds” sounds like the perfect New Year’s resolution.
But for this to work we have to want that change.

⌛    ✞    ⌚

But really, do any New Year’s resolutions last longer than a week? It’s not that folk don’t want to stop procrastinating, exercise more, or to learn how to meditate.
It just doesn’t seem to happen.

My take on that is that if you’ve got time to breathe, you’ve got time to meditate. But I’m a fine one to talk, I’m a terrible procrastinator.

New Year’s Day: Now is the accepted time to make your regular annual good resolutions. Next week you can begin paving hell with them as usual.” Mark Twain

More

HAPPY NEW YEAR! * as the Old Year dies, can contemplating our own Demise make us Happy?

 Excerpt from Amitabha Centre publicity: .

Death Med GKG text

Meditating on our own Death makes us Happy 

It sounds counter-intuitive, but Buddha taught that meditating on the inevitability of our own demise is an uplifting experience. The death meditation being one of my favourites, I can definitely vouch for this.

To meditate on an idea or a course of action means to focus all of our attention on it. As Chönden said “to take it to heart“. He added that to focus our mind on our own death means to “follow the path of peaceful, positive minds.”

This is because thinking about death stops us from getting so uptight and stressed by things. It frees up space in our busy mind, so that there’s space for peace and feeling OK about life instead.

Death Meditation Analogy

For me it’s like clearing the internet browser’s cache when it gets overloaded and confused trying to deal with badly formatted and incomplete web pages. Emptying the computer’s cache is like clearing your mind from all those thoughts and worries, so it can start afresh.
And just as that makes surfing the web a lot smoother, a clear mind can relax and let go, because there’s no need to worry so much. Freeing our mind up from the daily stressors and concerns means we can “enjoy life instead of worrying about it.” Chönden

⌛    ✞    ⌚

Death course GKC

Personal experience of this on here: David Thomas on Buddhism and Looking Death Straight in the Eye

Continued here:
Make the Perfect New Year’s Resolution based on an Awareness o
f Death
and
Kill Procrastination ⌚ image

Brilliant article on Learning to meditate in 2013 from Kadampa Life 

These notes taken in Gen Chönden’s first teaching on the death meditation at Amitabha Centre, new year’s eve.
Top image from Amitabha Centre publicity, click on it to make biG

Comment below ⤵ on this classic Buddhist meditation.

Clearing the Confusion with Buddha’s Blessings

<(((º>

Manjushri Statue

I’m studying for an exam this weekend on Buddhist scriptures *
I’m also nursing a flu-ey headache, my brain feels like dough, and the dogs are restless with the fireworks.
(Are the sonic booms really necessary?)
=(lots to transform)

What to do?!
Playing about in the world wide web of distraction probably isn’t recommended. But I do like sharing Dharma when I get the chance, and I thought this might help…

Manjushri’s mantra

is good for clearing the clouds of confusion from our minds
OM AH RA PA TSA NA DHI

Manjushri is the Buddha of Wisdom.
Reciting his mantra with faith definitely helps, especially when you’re thinking things through.
Especially when you’ve thought things through a lot, and are only getting more and more confused, even perhaps a little perturbed.

 Sad but true. Any anxious thought swimming round your head, if unchecked, will rapidly grow to an alarming size. <((((º>

More

Local News : Training in Mindfulness & Concentration – Afternoon Course

Gen Chönden

This short course on training in mindfulness and concentration, will present methods for developing the main mental functions that we use when we meditate.

Sunday 28 October, 2 – 5pm*
Amitabha Buddhist Centre, Bristol, UK

* There will be an opportunity to do a short retreat in December for those who follow the training.

Mindfulness

Mindfulness is the life force of meditation” – Geshe Kelsang.
It’s function is to prevent distractions, so that we don’t forget what we’re meditating on. It’s that simple, and that difficult!

Concentration

Concentration depends upon mindfulness. It is the ability to focus the mind on a particular object, and remain there without moving away from it.
We use these two mental factors to meditate on an object – penetrating deep into the heart of it, staying with it, and fully understanding it.

Retreat

It is important to study and learn about Buddhist teachings, and to meditate daily. But it is only on retreat that we really familiarise ourselves enough with Buddha’s teachings to change our minds on a fundamental level.

 


Meditation descriptions from ‘Understanding the Mind’, Geshe Kelsang Gyatso
For booking information see Amitabha Buddhist Centre’s website
NZ Group photo credit 

Previous Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: