Karma teaser (JP Revision Notes)

   Post on Karma coming soon.

    ~ if we all share the karma to experience it of course.

                                                                                                         😉

   Coz the world we live in and our shared perception of it, is totally the result of our collective karma.

 

photo by Jas



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Joyful Path of Good Fortune ~ Paths

Atisha on the front cover of my book.
(OK, so it’s well used.But much loved as well)

Buddha demonstrated how to follow a path of inner transformation”

“It leads to the complete eradication of all traces of negativity and confusion from the mind and the attainment of sublime qualities such as universal compassion and wisdom realizing the true nature of all phenomena… This special arrangement became known as the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, or Lamrim.” (NKT website) The great Indian Pandit Atisha gave instructions on how to practice these teachings. Joyful Path of Good Fortune is Geshe Kelsang’s commentary to these instructions.

What is a ‘joyful path’? My best guess: a spiritual path is a mind conjoined with renunciation, which is “a light and happy mind bound for freedom” (I think Nagarjuna said that).
And ‘joyful’ will refer to joyful effort ~ a mind that delights in virtue, and is free from non-virtue.

Generally ‘minds’ – or what we think – are internal paths that take us someplace, just as external ‘paths’ lead us to a destination.
This Lamrim text is based on Atisha’s ‘Lamp to the Path to Enlightenment’.

SO, these brilliant instructions illuminate the path that enables us to find lasting inner peace and happiness. Pretty awesome 🙂

nb:
Definitions from Ocean of Nectar, Geshe Kelsang Gyatso.
Notes and Paths 

Notes and Paths

We’ve got a new category called ‘Paths’.
(listed up there in the heading, and over to the right) The title’s a tad obscure, but it’s a good box to put these things in:-

☆ Courses I’ve been to,
(‘path’ being a synonym of ‘course’ ;~)
Ways of being which lead to higher states of mind, and so higher states of being.

What are Buddhist ‘Paths’?

A spiritual path is a mind conjoined with renunciation, which is a strong wish to escape from our hamster-wheel lives of relentless suffering and pain (samsara).
Generally ‘minds’ – or what we think – are internal paths that take us someplace; just as external ‘paths’ lead us to a destination.
(For lots more interesting word meanings, please see the appendix)

For example, there’s a foot-path that runs by the hospital near here; but you wouldn’t want to take it because it’s narrow, and full of litter and dog poo.
Likewise, we sometimes get shitty minds of anger that bypass any attempt at rational thinking. They reinforce dark moods with some very narrow-mindedness, and litter them with nasty little thoughts. You wouldn’t want to follow these internal paths either, because they lead to a negative and hurtful state of mind. (not that that always stops us taking an ill-advised train of thought through to its negative conclusion. Unless we’ve practiced, it’s run away with us before we’ve even noticed.)
Shantideva said that the path to hell is paved with our misdeeds. He meant this as fact. Killing a living being out of anger creates the cause for a lowly rebirth.
But if we find that hard to understand or accept, we can take it as figurative.

Whatever – we all know that negative thoughts leads us to do negative things, which sooner or later lead to unwanted results. These minds are best avoided.
(Shantideva was a 7th century mendicant and totally brilliant Buddhist.)

A Joyful Path

Is a positive state of mind. We remain peaceful, which makes us feel happy and content. And not just on days when everything’s going right for us. As we get good at it, we can keep our train of thought on the right track, whatever the circumstances.
Joyful Path of Good Fortune is like our bible of Lamrim teachings.

nb:
‘Paths’ definition from Ocean of Nectar, Geshe Kelsang Gyatso.

Joyful Path of Good Fortune ~ Paths

 

Quick fixes

… knowing that we can work with it when it doesn’t, helps more.

Procrastination In Paint

View original post

Inheriting your own karma – image

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Priscilla’s experience of how Buddhism changed her life (Pt 1+2)

Click here for Part 1 “The Dharma has shown me the true nature of love
without attachment.

Click here for Part 2  I’d never felt happier in my whole life

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“If it’s not virtue I don’t want it.” Barry (Conversations with Kadampas)

“Is negative karma ripening as suffering a reason to celebrate?” (Dave, Bristol)
Some Buddhist friends were discussing views on karma.
I liked what Barry said then:
“If you’ve got Dharma, all your problems are an opportunity to develop your inner wealth. Virtues like love, compassion and patience are the most valuable wealth you can have.

“You don’t need external things to be happy”

You can’t consume your way to happiness. Trying to do that just makes you more unhappy.
Happiness comes from within. From your own mind. That’s what makes the difference, what you do with your own mind.
JasAye, I agree. Happiness is a state of mind. You’re not gonna find its causes outside the mind.

 “If it’s not virtue I don’t want it!”

Barry – You need a positive loving mind for others. I think you have to become obsessed with virtue.
All of our daily tasks are an opportunity to practice. We can turn the most mundane things into spiritual growth.
Jas – Like what?
Barry – Well, when you’re washing dishes you can think as you’re cleaning them “I’m washing my negative karma away now.” Or when you’re showering, you can imagine you’re cleaning your mental continuum as well as your body.
You can apply Dharma to everything.
JasSounds great
Barry – It is 🙂

Barry is working in Bristol as a freelance journalist. His hometown is Kilfinane, Ireland. 


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